The wider context surrounding GOTGE

(Introductory ‘Sticky’ Blog post – Links also here)

‘The Story So Far’ portion of the GOTGE Blog was a way of illustrating the sheer rapidity of how this music scene crept up on me – a matter of still under a year, as I write. It was a partially redacted digest of the E-Mails I sent to my poor put-upon brother about my latest discoveries.

The reader will need to know the following to put GOTGE into its fullest context (demonstrating that GOTGE hasn’t arisen in a vacuum. There have been other events surrounding it.)

(a) In November 2014 my father just happened to switch on the local radio station as ‘I’ll Go Where Your Music Takes Me’, by Jimmy James and The Vagabonds was being played, which I overheard and was reminded of a French version of that song – ‘Ne raccroche pas, je t’aime’ (‘Don’t Hang Up, I Love You’) by Carene Cheryl, of whom I first became aware some decade or so before that, after finding a photo of her in an old ‘Paris Match’  (dated 13th November 1976) which had been amongst a pile of old copies of that publication, dating from the Mid- to Late-1970s in our attic and wondered why I’d never heard of her – she coming from what I would call ‘my generation’. It fairly soon became clear to me that we were rapidly approaching the fortieth anniversary of the beginning of her recording career in January 1975, so I decided to start ordering her records on-line on the respective fortieth anniversaries of their original release, although, in view of the subsequent, almost overnight developing of an interest in the Pop Music of the Former Eastern Bloc, regrettably, I have had to abandon this – which I eventually decided to do as of her fourth single, ‘Samedi, dimanche, et fêtes’, released in the Spring of 1976 – on the basis that one can only order so many records on-line. It meant that I have, ironically, missed out on the aforementioned ‘Ne raccroche pas, je t’aime’ and Carene’s second LP, also of that name, both released in the Autumn of 1976, but when once one does decide to do something like that when is a ‘good time’ to do it?

More relevant facts in this respect are that she shares the same birthday as me, incredibly enough, she later (in 1978) changed stage name and image and became Karen Cheryl and that her real name is Isabelle Morizet and that under that name she currently presents (on the radio station Europe 1) two hour-long shows per week, interviewing personalities from various fields on Saturday and Sunday mornings (at 10.00 am UK time) entitled ‘Il n’y a pas qu’une vie dans la vie’. In addition to all this she was a Winner of the First Prize at France’s National Drumming Conservatoire.

The clip of Carene performing a live version of ‘Ne raccroche pas, je t’aime’ comes from an appearance on 30th January 1977 on the show ‘Musique and music’. During this episode, since her agricultural background was often traded on, she drove her father’s tractor and also led a cow onto the stage, improbable though that may sound, given the glamorous gown she was wearing!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

P11_PM_13_11_1976_Page

(Note the spelling ‘Carène Cheril’…it was fortunate that my initial searching on that mis-spelled term way back in 2004 found something. Otherwise my personal life history might have turned out somewhat differently!)

http://www.europe1.fr/emissions/il-n-y-a-pas-qu-une-vie-dans-la-vie

https://www.facebook.com/Morizet.Europe1/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED&fref=nf

The clip below of Carene being interviewed after playing a short drum solo comes from an edition of the TV magazine programme ‘Aujourd’hui madame’ dated 11th August 1976. If one has an outline understanding of the French language one will note that there is a reference to her being eighteen years of age at the time of the interview. If she had been born in 1955, as most Web-based sources quote her birth year, this would have been impossible! (That would have had her turning eighteen in 1973, circa one-and-a-half years before her recording career began!) That is why I am so confident that I am correct in quoting her birth year as 1957, which would have made her eighteen between 19th July 1975 and 18th July 1976. The actual interview itself would probably have been conducted shortly before she turned nineteen on 19th July 1976, therefore. If one has an outline understanding of French, likewise, one will note a reference to her previous ambitions for a career in Medicine.

https://player.ina.fr/player/embed/I15201198/1/1b0bd203fbcd702f9bc9b10ac3d0fc21/460/259/1

Elsewhere in that collection of old ‘Paris Match’ magazines (in an edition dated 31st December 1976 – so just a month or so before the aforementioned performance of ‘Ne raccroche pas, je t’aime’) one can see who the presenter of ‘Musique and music’ was – the great French entertainer, Jacques Martin, whose life and work was celebrated last November (21st) on a programme on France 2, entitled ‘On a tous en nous quelque chose de Jacques Martin’ (‘We’ve All Got A Bit Of Jacques Martin In Us’), a trailer for which one can see linked below. I suppose  one could call him a sort of ‘French Sir Bruce Forsyth’, in that context.

j_martin_31_12_1976

http://www.programme-tv.net/videos/bandes-annonces/49717-on-a-tous-en-nous-quelque-chose-de-jacques-martin-france-2-samedi-21-novembre-2015/

(b) Some three or so years ago, in the series of re-broadcasts of ‘Top Of The Pops’, The New Seekers appeared singing ‘Anthem (One Day In Every Week)’ (incidentally, on the episode from the day after my 17th birthday on 19th July 1978, when I was actually out of the country for the first time in my life, on a schools’ exchange trip to Nienburg, about half-way between Bremen and Hannover). Since I was so impressed with it I looked into it on ‘YouTube’ and my attention was, in the process, (somewhat indirectly, clearly, since it is very difficult now to try to re-construct how that might have originally occurred), drawn to a lot of related material on the early-1970s group from Scotland, Middle Of The Road, which, in turn, led me to all manner of connections on the Continental Mainland (and in some cases way beyond) performing their own versions of MOTR songs. Amongst these was Hana Zagorová’s ‘Pan Tydlitýt a pan Tydlitát’ (‘Mr. Tydlitýt And Mr. Tydlitát’). My careers advisor’s suggestion at the end of May 2015 that the future of careers in languages lay in those of Eastern Europe made me think of matters Czech and since I’d found out all these things about Isabelle Morizet over the years I wondered what I’d find on Hana.

…and the video below was my first-ever encounter with the world that was to become GOTGE.

(c) Some years ago I brought a copy of the book ‘Bubblegum Music Is The Naked Truth’ out of the library. There was a chapter in the book devoted to the Dutch Girl Group of the late 1970s, LUV’, in whom I have had an interest for some time. Also last Summer, as I was trawling through some old colleagues seeing if they had a LinkedIn presence, I encountered an old friend from The Netherlands, with whom I got in touch and since I was already in a musical groove from that period that got me thinking LUV’ thoughts all over again, which, at length, brought me in contact with all sorts of other Dutch Girl Groups of the late-1970s/early-1980s, plus the Belgian Girl Group of that sort of era, Venus…who, to keep the Eastern European connection going, clearly appeared on East German TV, as seen in the video below, taken from the entertainment/variety show, ‘Ein Kessel Buntes’, making me realise that it was a Girl Group boom almost up there with that of Early-1960s America.

(d) Finally, since I have been looking into the Female Pop Music scene in Communist Europe from an era within my living memory, for the purposes of political balance I thought that looking into the other political extreme, Franco’s and Salazar’s Fascist regimes, respectively in Spain and Portugal, might be a good idea, using the 1971 Eurovision Song Contest Runner-Up, Karina, as a way into that. The video embedded below is not that ESC entry. It is one of those B-Sides (from 1969) that effectively ended up being treated as the A-Side, given its massive popularity and has gone down in Spanish Pop Music history as a record that defined both Karina’s career and that particular era and has even been referred to by some as an alternative national anthem. I was so inspired by it myself when I discovered it on-line back in December 2015 that I actually bought a copy of the original vinyl record forthwith.

I hope that this adequately sets out the wider context.

‘The Story So Far’ concludes with a summary of my experiences going to Slovakia for the first time in my life, variously to attend a concert marking the fortieth anniversary of the death of Eva Kostolányiová, in Bratislava and to visit the birthplace of Valérie Čižmárová, Michalovce.

A fellow Blog on this sort of subject: ‘Funky Czech-In’ – An introduction to Czech and Slovak pop music from the sixties, seventies and eighties with a touch of funk, soul, disco and jazz.

Another fellow Blog: ‘Interstellar Medium’ – Vintage Eastern/Western Pop from the 20th century, without necessarily being psychedelic! Spices, perfumes, tissues, seeds…, of which I have started to be a ‘Follower’….and which is now a ‘Follower’ of ‘Girls Of The Golden East’.

The first ‘Follower’ of ‘Girls Of The Golden East’: ‘Cue Castanets!’ – Musings on Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound and similar music….and going the opposite way around to the aforementioned Blog, ‘Girls Of The Golden East’ is now a ‘Follower’ of ‘Cue Castanets!’, in return for the favour.

The party in charge of the following Blog has been good enough to link ‘Girls Of The Golden East’, so, by way of a returning of that compliment…: Denim Disco – Blog dedicated to the pop music and culture of the 1970’s. ~ Glam Pop and Discotheque Rock ~ The Sound Of The 70’s.

I have now had the very great privilege to have had my application to join the ‘Valérie ČIŽMÁROVÁ’ Facebook Group accepted as a gift to ‘Girls Of The Golden East’ for the New Year of 2017.

‘Bananas For Breakfast’ – My Fan Blog for Valérie Čižmárová.

Aleš Korábek’s Valérie Čižmárová Fan Site.

My first professional writing contract – for the Blog, ‘Englishman In Slovakia’.

Go East: the Sensual Sounds (and Sights!) of Female-led Czech and Slovak Pop From the ’60’s to the ’80’s

 

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Všechno nejlepší k narozeninám

Today is a double celebration (also marked over on ‘Bananas For Breakfast’) of the forty-sixth ‘birthday’ of the recording – at the studio in Dejvice, Prague – of two records that were based on the orange RCA label Bubblegum Pop output of, variously, and Middle Of The Road and The Sweet.

Hana Zagorová – the one who started my journey into the weird and wonderful world of Eastern Bloc female Pop – took on Middle Of The Road’s ‘Tweedle Dee, Tweedle Dum’, as ‘Pan Tydlitýt a pan Tydlitát’, while Valérie Čižmárová took on The Sweet’s ‘Co-Co’, as ‘Koko’.

This was going to be a more thoroughly-written affair, but I’ve just fully joined the ‘communications revolution’ and have been busy this evening with seeing how my blog looks on a proper smartphone!

I’ll get this out while it’s still the 22nd!

It is a hugely significant date, though, so I at least wanted to mark it.

There’s a train a-comin’…to Olomouc hlavní nádraží

In this ‘Girls Of The Golden East’ post there is a continuation of the recent theme of:

(a) Helena Blehárová

(b) Trains

and

(c) Football (or ‘Soccer’, to American readers!)

The most recent of the Helena Blehárová videos I have encountered is her Czech-language version of the Curtis Mayfield song, originally recorded by The Impressions in 1965, ‘People Get Ready’ – the lyrics immediately following the title being “there’s a train a-comin'” – ‘Život jde dál’ (‘Life Goes On’), from 1973, accompanied by Gustav Brom and his Orchestra.

Being an aficionado of Modernist Architecture, I was wondering where this striking complex of buildings might be. ‘Intersigma’, it transpired, is a fairly international term, not really incontrovertibly specifically Czech or Slovak, but thank goodness that one of the signs in the background dropped the ‘Inter-‘ to leave just ‘Sigma’, which gave a massive clue regarding the city where this video would have been shot.

Knowing a thing or two about football clubs in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, I was already familiar with the name Sigma Olomouc, the full name of which is actually SK Sigma Olomouc. If one compares the logos on the shirts of the SK Sigma Olomouc players in this Winter Break fixture away at, it just so happens, Helena Blehárová’s home city club, MŠK Žilina – incidentally, with the same snow in the background as would have lain there four, five and six days after this match, when I was visiting the city back in January this year – with that on the signs in the background in the ‘Život jde dál’ video, that is the ‘clincher’. It more or less 100% is Olomouc, therefore.

This is another one of those cases where my dealings with matters Eastern European go back some way, since when the group Half Man Half Biscuit had ‘All I Want For Christmas Is A Dukla Prague Away Kit’ out in the mid-1980s I had already heard the name Sigma Olomouc by then and was quite taken with the sound of it, so my alternative version of that would have been ‘All I Want For Christmas Is A Sigma Olomouc Away Kit’. I wasn’t quite aware at the time, though, that their home kit is blue and white – just like my club, Norwich City’s dreaded local rivals, Ipswich Town…which might have put me off a little…at that time, but not at the height of the ‘Girls Of The Golden East’ Era, I hasten to add. Please read below to see why.

Curiously, in the heart of the ‘Girls Of The Golden East’ Era in the early 1970s, my ‘adoption’ of Norwich City was still some years into the future and as a Derbyshireman and as one with affectionate feelings vis-à-vis the North-East Derbyshire town of Chesterfield at the time – (a) the days out with Dad and my older brother, Julian at Derbyshire County Cricket Club matches at Chesterfield’s beautiful Queen’s Park ground, with lunchtime boating on the lake were a dream and (b) a new family ‘tradition’ sprang up whereby the treat of a fireworks party on Guy Fawkes’ Night was replaced by a Chinese meal for the family, when that was still considered something quite exotic, at the ‘Superior’ restaurant in Chesterfield – I exercised my right to be a bit different from Derby County-supporting Julian by becoming a Chesterfield fan. They happen to play in blue and white, so I haven’t always been ‘allergic’ to football teams who play in that strip!

Furthermore, when I was picking through a selection of Scottish clubs to ‘adopt’ in the days of the family’s ‘Dormobile’ holidays in Scotland in the late 1960s, another name that cropped up before I eventually settled on Dunfermline Athletic, on the basis that I liked the sound of the name, was the Perth-based club, St. Johnstone…who play in…you guessed it…blue and white!

So, thank you, Helenka, for reminding me of the days when footballing blue and white wasn’t ‘poison’, even though your home city team is yellow and green!

In keeping with early 1970s feelings, then, there might be nothing untoward at all about my becoming an SK Sigma Olomouc fan, after all!

An East Anglian in the Eastern Bloc

Having looked into what was properly titled the Daily Mail International Jazz Festival of 1963, taking place from 6th to 9th June, where a nineteen-year-old Helena Blehárová performed, amongst other songs, ‘Moonlight In Vermont’, my attention has been drawn to another one of the artists appearing at the Festival – Beryl Bryden.

It transpires that Beryl Bryden was born in Norwich, and would appear to have had a Czech-language version of her name (‘Beryl Brydenová’), on account of having been released, on more than one occasion, so it would appear, on the Czech labels, Supraphon and Gramofonový Klub.

If one takes a closer look (‘More images’) at her album from 1968, ‘Beryl Bryden a Pražský Dixieland’, one notes that it was recorded at the studios at Dejvice, Prague, with these three names amongst the recording personnel: Mojmír Balling, František Řebíček and Jiří Brabec, all of whom worked with none other than Valérie Čižmárová on her eponymous album at Dejvice at precisely that time of year, six years afterwards.

Another singer who has worked with Pražský Dixieland is Jitka Vrbová, whose maiden surname was Kočaříková. It would appear that, as Jitka Kočaříková, she was in the group, Fortuna….and who else should have been a member of Fortuna but Petra Černocká, whose ‘Koukej, se mnou si píseň broukej’ was featured as one of the medley of five ‘oldies’ that was the opening track of Valérie Čižmárová’s aforementioned album!

This has to be considered an extraordinary set of musical connections in itself. However, it gets even more so when one considers some personal ones relating to ‘yours truly’.

My mother’s first name was Beryl and she was an amateur operatic singer whose first leading role with Derby’s Laurence Lee Operatic Society was as Mařenka in Bedřich Smetana’s ‘Prodaná nevěsta’ (‘The Bartered Bride’), in both Valérie Čižmárová’s birth year of 1952 and at the age when Valérie Čižmárová’s recording career would have been at its height.

I am – despite being born and brought up in Derbyshire – an adoptive fan of Norwich City, who, like Helena Blehárová’s home city club, MŠK Žilina, play in yellow and green, which, interestingly enough, were – talking of Manchester – Manchester United’s team colours in the club’s formative years as Newton Heath, as re-visited as a change strip in the very early days of the English Premier League and again in the ‘green and gold’ protests against the ownership of the club by the American Glazer family, resulting in Norwich City fans visiting Old Trafford chanting at the green and gold protestors, “We’re Norwich City, we’re here for our scarves!”

So, for one, as myself, being the person in charge of ‘Girls Of The Golden East’, I do not think that there could be a more coincidental constellation than a singer whose first name was Beryl coming from the city of my adoptive football club, being at a festival in a city also associated with yellow and green in respect of football with another singer from a yellow and green footballing city in the Slovak portion of Czechoslovakia, recording in Czechoslovakia in the year when I really first became aware of the place, at the studios where my eventual favourite ‘Girl Of The Golden East’ would go on to record – alongside some of the same recording personnel – a song by someone who worked with an artist who was accompanied by the same group as the aforementioned Beryl.

Could one make that up?

By way of signing off this post in style, the following video, of the First Semi-Final Evening at the Bratislavská Lýra of 30th May to 2nd June 1973, is the reason why Valérie Čižmárová recorded ‘Koukej, se mnou si píseň broukej’ as an ‘oldie’ on her album, since Petra Černocká was due to perform it herself, but was indisposed, so Valérie Čižmárová was called in as an understudy. It is the sixth song in, immediately following on from Helena Blehárová, interestingly enough. Other cracking names to look out for are: Vlaďka Prachařová (with Karel Zich) (fourth song), Eva Kostolányiová (eighth song) and Marie Rottrová (tenth song).

Since this is a video originating from Slovakia (by ‘RETRO SLOVAK’) Valérie Čižmárová is listed under the first name ‘Valéria’. I have contacted Aleš Korábek concerning this apparent ‘error’ in Slovak-based sources. She was indeed named ‘Valéria’ at birth, but on moving to the Czech-speaking part of the country, where the local variant is ‘Valérie’, her official professional name was harmonised with that variant, variously with and without the accent over the middle ‘e’.

The Chattanooga Choo Choo, arriving at Manchester Piccadilly

Just about a year on from my first uncovering the fact that Helena Blehárová was perhaps the only one of my ‘Girls Of The Golden East’ from Czechoslovakia to have actually performed on stage in this country, at the Manchester Jazz Festival of 1964, I just happen, this morning, quite by accident, to have encountered this video (up on YouTube since 3rd July this year, by ‘Pepan’) of her singing, in English – so maybe this would have been one of the songs she would have performed in Manchester – that old Big Band Era number, ‘Chattanooga Choo Choo’, being given a more contemporary ‘twist’ by the accompanying dancers, dancing, well, what else but the Twist?

Although this video is way outside the core of the GOTGE Era it perhaps feeds into a musical interest of mine which was very much contemporaneous with those early-1970s days. For a time in that period family members of members of the Glenn Miller-style Syd Lawrence Orchestra (not just core family members, either) had the perk of free tickets to their concerts. My uncle, Frank Dixon, was the Lead Trombonist, so Mum, Dad, Julian and I could all get into the Syd Lawrence Orchestra’s concerts, free-of-charge, at the King’s Hall in Derby, which was also the Queen Street Baths – now Queen’s Leisure Centre, made world-famous as the place where the breaststroking ace, Adam Peaty, started his swimming career – with the pool temporarily covered over, so the audience were sitting over water. Here is Uncle Frank with the Syd Lawrence Orchestra, playing ‘I’m Getting Sentimental Over You’ on the 1970 LP, ‘Big Band Sounds’.

This also ties in with the French star with the same birthday as me who started off the journey of musical discoveries in cyberspace that ended up in Eastern Europe, Carene Cheryl, since here she is (on 28th August 1978, on the show «TV Music Hall») showing off the skills that won her the First Prize at France’s National Conservatoire for Drumming.

I had a hankering for going into drumming in the early 1970s and, chatting to the members of the Syd Lawrence Orchestra after one of their King’s Hall concerts, I mentioned this to the orchestra’s drummer, Fergie Maynard, who promptly presented me with a pair of Premier drumsticks.

I will not pretend that the drumming career of this child of 19th July has ever reached the heights of that of the rather better-known one from France!

According to Robert Rohál’s book – from which I have hitherto taken this information – ‘Legendy Československe populární hudby’ it was 1964 when Helena came to Manchester.

However, according to this source, at the National Jazz Archive’s site, that date should have been taken one year back in time. We also have the bonus of an exact date and venue – to be precise, Friday, 7th June 1963, at Belle Vue.

Until now, it has been my impression that Helena would only have gone to Manchester – given a birth date of 28th June 1943 and the fact that she moved from her home city of Žilina to Brno aged nineteen – after that move. If she was in Manchester still aged just nineteen it is possible that that ‘Chattanooga Choo Choo’ referred to in the title of this post could have been arriving directly from Žilina, rather than passing through Brno on the way!

It is very gratifying to see Karel Vlach mentioned in that National Jazz Archive site – as accompanying Valérie Čižmárová in ‘Pojď jen dál’, here on the TV show ‘3.program Orchestru Karla Vlacha’ (‘3rd Programme Of The Karel Vlach Orchestra’), on Helena’s 30th birthday of 28th June 1973.

It seems like I’ll have to take a trip to Belle Vue next 7th June, then, in my ‘Girls Of The Golden East’-related Pop Pilgrimages!

La mulți ani, Margareta, Angela, și Mirabela (70.)!

Today’s date marks three birthdays in ‘GOTGE-land’. Furthermore, these are three birthdays all from the same country – Romania.

9th July is the birthday of – in order of birth – Margareta Pâslaru (74 today), Angela Similea (71 today) and Mirabela Dauer (exactly 70 today).

Perhaps the most notable new material to have come to my attention regarding this auspicious occasion of late is this excellent – and, what’s more, entirely self-composed – song from that increasingly important year of 1973, ‘Timpul’ (‘Time’), released as simply ‘Margareta’, accompanied by Orchestra Alex. Avramovici.

Here are the lyrics, (credited to ‘Margareta Pîslaru’) together with an IMTranslator-based translation, suitably modified, from the original Romanian into English, some of which sort of sum up my feelings regarding my relationship with the World of GOTGE.

Timpul
Timpul te nvata atatea lucruri noi
Te ajuta astazi sa ntelegi
Tot ce ieri nu stiai sa vezi
Timpul , timpul
As da orice
Sa ntorc timpul inapoi
Sa regasesec tot ce am pierdut
Sa ndrept raul ce am facut

time
Time teaches you many new things
It helps to understand today
All yesterday you could not see
Time, Time
I would give anything
To come back during back
All I lost was regasesec
I’m heading to the river made

As da orice
Sa ntorc timpul inapoi
Sa regasesec tot ce am pierdut
Sa ndrept raul ce am facut

I would give anything
To come back during back
All I lost was regasesec
I’m heading to the river made

Timpul
Te a preschimbat din copil in om matur
Ti a adus iubirea
Si tot el ti a luat o inapoi
Timpul , timpul
As da orice
Sa ntorc timpul inapoi
Sa regasesec tot ce am pierdut
Sa ndrept raul ce am facut

time
He exchanged the child mature man
Ti brought love
And he took it back to you
Time, Time
I would give anything
To come back during back
All I lost was regasesec
I’m heading to the river made

As da orice
Sa ntorc timpul inapoi
Sa regasesec tot ce am pierdut
Sa ndrept raul ce am facut
Timpul iti da mereu cate ceva
Dar iti ia ntr o zi
Fara sa stii chiar viata ta
Timpul , timpul

I would give anything
To come back during back
All I lost was regasesec
I’m heading to the river made
Time always gives you something
But it takes NTR one days
Without knowing even your life
Time, Time

As da orice
Sa ntorc timpul inapoi
Sa regasesec tot ce am pierdut
Sa ndrept raul ce am facut

I would give anything
To come back during back
All I lost was regasesec
I’m heading to the river made

As da orice
Sa ntorc timpul inapoi
Sa regasesec tot ce am pïerdut
Sa ndrept raul ce am facut

I would give anything
To come back during back
All I lost was regasesec
I’m heading to the river made

It would appear that this is yet more entirely natively-conceived, very Soul-like 1970s Pop originating from the former Eastern Bloc.

Don’t do as The Pet Shop Boys sang! Go East!

Now it has been established that my recently-published article for the ‘Englishman In Slovakia’ blog has reached its conclusion the original, full article, together with its associated media, can be published here without my being in breach of contract.

Here it is.

Englishman_In_Slovakia_Article

Here is the ‘chart run-down’ to go with the article.

No. 6

No. 5

No. 4

No. 3

No. 2

No. 1

Všetko najlepšie k narodeninám, Helenka!

Well, it seems I ‘only’ forgot Helena Vondráčková’s 70th birthday four days back!

So, I’m certainly not going to forget that other Helena (Blehárová) today.

To celebrate, here’s one I haven’t embedded before – 1968’s ‘Tak dávno’ (‘So Long Ago’) by Bohuslav Ondráček (music) and Zdeněk Rytíř (lyrics), with instrumental accompaniment from Orchestr Karla Krautgartnera under Josef Vobruba and backing vocals from Sbor Lubomíra Pánka…showing what a Soulful Lady she is.